Advertisement Picture


Advertisement Picture


Birdwatch News Archive


Deep-blue Flowerpiercer is one of the species in the study that does not appear to be adapting its altitudinal habitat swiftly enough. Photo: German Forero-Medina.
Deep-blue Flowerpiercer is one of the species in the study that does not appear to be adapting its altitudinal habitat swiftly enough. Photo: German Forero-Medina.Enlarge image

Tropical birds move up


Posted on: 10 Dec 2011

Tropical birds are moving to higher elevations because of climate change, but they may not be moving fast enough, according to a new study.


The study, published in the peer-reviewed online journal PLoS ONE, finds that the birds aren’t migrating as rapidly as scientists previously anticipated, based on recorded temperature increases. The animals instead may be tracking changes in vegetation, which can only move slowly via seed dispersal. 


“This is the first study to evaluate the effects of warming on the elevation ranges of tropical birds,” said Stuart Pimm, a co-author of the study.  “It provides new evidence of their response to warming, but also shows there is a delay in their response.”


Evidence from temperate areas, such as North America and Europe, shows that many animal and plant species are adapting to climate change by migrating northward, breeding earlier or flowering earlier in response to rising temperatures.  


“However, our understanding of the response of tropical birds to warming is still poor,” said German Forero-Medina, lead author of the study. “Moving to the north doesn’t help them because tropical temperatures do not change very much with latitude. So moving up to higher elevations is the only way to go, but there are few historical data that can serve as baselines for comparison over time.”


What is going on with tropical species at higher altitudes is important, Forero-Medina said, because about half of all birds species live 3,500 feet or more above sea level, and of these species, more than 80 percent may live within the tropics. 


In 2010, the authors of the new study and a team of biologists participated in an expedition to the summit of the remote Cerros del Sira mountains in central Peru – a place previousl y visited by only a few ornithologists. The complex topography, geology and climate of the mountains have produced isolated patches of habitat with unique avian communities and distinct forms. 


Forero-Medina and his colleagues used survey data collected on bird species in the region in the 1970s to compare past and present distributions. “Using John Terborgh’s groundbreaking data - the first ever collected from this region - gave us a unique opportunity to understand the effects of 40 years of climate warming on tropical birds,” Forero-Medina says.  


The team found that although the ranges of many bird species have shifted uphill since the 1970s, the shifts fell short of what scientists had projected based on temperature increases over the four decades.  


“This may be bad news,” Pimm said.  “Species may be damned if they move to higher elevations to keep cool and then simply run out of habitat. But, by staying put, they may have more habitat but they may overheat.”


Reference
Forero-Medina , G, Terborgh, J, Socolar, S J and Pimm S L. 2011. Elevational Ranges of Birds on a
Tropical Montane Gradient Lag Behind Warming Temperatures" PLoS ONE 6: e28535. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0028535

 




Your Comments

Tell us what you think...

You must be logged in to leave a comment. You can log in here.
If you don't have a user account please register.

Other News

May's Birdwatch hits the shops today!

Posted: 24 Apr 2014
The May issue of Birdwatch goes on sale at newsstands today, and asks why have many of Britain's rarest breeding birds never quite managed to colonise.

Read more…


British oil company illegally surveying Congo national park?

Posted: 23 Apr 2014
Conservation organization the Worldwide Fund for Nature (WWF) has issued a call to UK oil company Soco International PLC to respond to allegations revealed tonight in a documentary premiering at the Tribeca Film Festival.

Read more…


Fighting the bird massacre on Malta

Posted: 22 Apr 2014
Frustrated with the lack of progress made by conservation organisations, Chris Packham has flown to Malta to tackle illegal hunting head on.

Read more…


Long-tailed Duck wins court battle

Posted: 21 Apr 2014
Licenses to hunt endangered Long-tailed Ducks in southern Finland have been repealed after BirdLife took hunters to court.

Read more…


Not just birds – other wildlife is breeding early this year

Posted: 20 Apr 2014
The latest results from the British Trust for Ornithology’s (BTO) Garden BirdWatch reveal that much of our garden wildlife has become active extraordinarily early this year.

Read more…


  2 3 4 >

Back to News Listing